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I was posting over at Ferdinand von Prondzynski’s blog   ( http://universitydiary.wordpress.com/) when I thought that I should make the point on my own blog. Ferdinand was saying in support of changing university education that, “we simply cannot run a university system that now admits a large percentage of the population as if we were running small elite institutions. The elite students of former times generally had very un-specific expectations of their education. For them it was all part of assuming the knowledge and the style of privilege, not about undergoing specific vocational training.” I disagreed. Of course increased numbers and different times mean change but the whole purpose of increased access is to make higher learning available to all who can benefit. Moreover, that’s what the world of work now requires.

More vocational training rather than education is the demand of people – including students – who fail to appreciate what has happened to work and yet are aware that too many graduates complete their education lacking important skills.

The “information society” has consequences for university education. As a term, it is often reduced to meaningless guff but it should not be dismissed by thoughtful people. In careless use it becomes fused with “knowledge society” and provides a justification for a pretty daft approach to education: an increased emphasis on mere training for the majority and an increase in the number of PhDs. I don’t want to talk right now about the latter but training in preference to education is precisely what, let’s call it, industry doesn’t need right now.

Anyone who has given serious thought to the concept of an “information society” either from a political or a business perspective realises pretty quickly that such a society depends not merely on skilled people but on educated, thinking, and – yes – innovative people. In short, the humanities graduate’s time has come! (I recall commenting during a discussion with a group of lecturers that innovation is what separates a 2.1 from a 2.2.)

There are however “employability” problems with some graduates and the problems have nothing to do with the traditional university approach to learning. Too many students lack the skills necessary to making the best use of their education. Too many are not fully literate, cannot cope with the mathematics essential to a full life today, have no real understanding of technology or economics, have poor general knowledge and cannot present themselves or their work in public. These are mere skills and could never figure in a university education. However, it should not be possible to achieve the status of graduate without these skills. They are essential and they should be mastered while in primary and secondary school. Most lecturers are aware of the literacy and the general knowledge problem. Many may be aware that perhaps the majority of students are poor communicators and that work today demands effective participation at meetings and making presentations. Some lecturers may not have noticed the mathematics problem. What do I mean by this? Here are a few examples that I’ve come across. Students frequently have no grasp of the magnitude of numbers. They would find the creation of mathematical expressions for, say, a spreadsheet very difficult. The concept of random distribution would be new to them. I won’t labour this on into basic science, technology and economics. The point is that today effective citizenship – never mind a job – requires these skills. While someone without them should not be at university, most certainly a graduate must have them.

A university is not the place for teaching skills. However, until such time as the rest of the educational system addresses the problem, universities in order to maintain standards and credibility should test for them. There can be no question of awarding grades, let alone making it part of the degree programme. This is about finding competence; it is pass or fail. I realize that suggesting such tests – and I’m not talking about labour intensive exams. – seems impractical or extreme for institutes of higher learning but I can’t come up with another short term remedy.

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3 Comments

  1. A graduate should be able to present their ideas in writing (numerically where appropriate) and present them verbally to a small group. The first of these anyway should be integral to any degree.

  2. Hello Colum,
    I teach in an area where students are concerned more with the vocational elements of the course – skills, links with industry, work experience, ‘practical’ work etc – and see intellectual curiosity in the subject as perverse and irrelevant. The reason for this, it seems to me, is that they cannot conceive of education in any other terms than as an adjunct to the economy. Tony Blair in the UK encapsulated this outlook when he said that,’Education is our best economic policy’. Perhaps some educationalists were relieved to hear something that seemed to put them right at the heart of national life but the consequences have been that education has had a sort of identity crisis.

    But I am struggling to understand why, when it is so patently obvious that education rather than training is what employers value, universities just don’t seem to get this.

    I hope you write on this further.

  3. “A university is not the place for teaching skills”

    I think we need get away from the view that universities need to be homogeneous. Technical universities or business schools, not traditional unversities, should the place for learning skills. I think that the traditional universities should have never encroached into these area.
    Evidently they have, and are now faced with an identity crisis.

    Even within a degree program there is massive variety in the course content. Psychology students need good statistical skills in order to carry out important research. It is the universities job to teach those skills.


2 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. [...] *** I’ve written before about the changes wrought by technology and the skills which are now essentially a precondition for the employment of humanities graduates: http://colummccaffery.wordpress.com/2010/05/26/increased-emphasis-on-vocational-education-is-a-prett… [...]

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